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20120928
20121006
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
they are at a disadvantage, i completely agree with kleiza rice that the civil rights issue of our day is school choice and the disaster of the public schools, it is a universal law of nature that everything run by the government will become worse and more expensive over time. everything that is sold on the private market will become better and less expensive over time. like flat screen tv's, cell phones. versus the post office, public schools, and amtrak food service. and by the way, our entire health care is now going to be put in the hands -- in the capable hands of the federal government. >> one more school thing. also from "the new york times." >> i disagree. >> you may not. four decades after clashes, bottom of the again debates school busing. nearly four decades after the city was convulsed by violence over court-ordered segregation, boston is working to reduce its reliance on busing at a school system now made up of largely minority students. although court-ordered busing ended more than two decades ago, only 13% of students in boston, 13% in the public schools, today are white. and the school
on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice marshall -- attorney 30 marshall's -- ternate thurgood marshall -- attor
fighting a civil rights and virginia. we have a state where they want to go backward. the federal government can do a great job intervening in the delivery of recovery support services. meaning the federal dollars -- to me it would make sense to make them spend a small portion on recovery support services, to include housing. housing is a critical element in recovery. i guess my thought process goes -- somehow forced the state to discriminate against recovery, like they do in virginia, to spend some of the federal dollars on the offensive recovery support services. that is the nature of my thought process. by doing so, we can really reduce --, help recovery. to block out recovery people -- it is just insane to me. the state is not going to change. but the federal government if you just make a rule or regulation, you have got to spend a small amount of recovery and stop blowing it to agencies and virginia. i would be glad to elaborate after the press conference, of course. but that is the general thought and presidents. -- precedence. >> we have some programs that are specific arou
sapphire preferred. >>> the supreme court reconvenes monday with critical civil rights cases on the agenda. but it's november 6th, presidential election day, that could be the biggest day for the future of the court. the average age of the supreme court justices is 66. four justices are in their mid to late 70s. the ideologically divided bench could swing either way depending on who sits in the oval office when the next justice retires. joining me is patricia ann millate head of the firm's supreme court practice. good morning. >> good morning. >> i know you've argued 31 cases before the supreme court. has that experience given you any insight into who might be the next justice to retire? >> well, i think it's very likely that the next president's going to have at least one, and maybe even two appointments on the court. obviously just statistically, if you look at age, justice ginsburg, ruth bader ginsburg is the most likely one if you just look at age. the longest serving ones, justices scalia and kennedy on the court. those type of factors obviously weigh in. >> i'm going to have myr d ja
cannot be paramount. dealing with civil-rights movement, you simply cannot accomplish your goals if you are worried about being sold. john: says segregated lunch counter? >> there is nothing simple about responding to someone making racist comments by raising your voice. or telling them to knock it off. but the government tells you, you cannot do that? that is not a way to run a free society. john: should it be legal to marry the wrong person? or to give a price about nutrition? that and more from north carolina. [ female announcer ] you want family dinner to be special. dad, we want pizza. you guys said tacos. [ female announcer ] it doesn't always work out that way. you know what? we're spending too much money on eating out anyway. honey, come look at this. [ female announcer ] my money map from wells fargo is a free online tool that helps you track your spending. so instead of having to deal with a tight budget, you could have a tighter family. ♪ wells fargo. together we'll go far. [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cl
. contrast that with a judge that was blocked by the democrats on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice
they say it vital their civil rights and causing outrage on both sides. >> having to put a sign on your door on halloween is like branding somebody. so when it's a scarlet letter or it's a yellow star of david for the nazi germany, you know, it's something that distinguishes everybody and actually makes them an outcast in their own community. >> i think it's a reasonable ordinance that the city has passed to help protect and keep us a safe city. >> gretchen: giving us the take is the host of "justice," judge jeanine pirro. all right. so i'm a parent. he's a parent, you're a parent. if you go out trick or troating with your kids, you night want to know if you're going to the house of a sex offender. >> you're right. the first obligation of government is protection of its citizens. as i listened to that attorney say it's like branding them, first of all, you can't even compare a predator pedophile to someone who is a victim of a holocaust. but let's get past that. they say it's a violation of their civil rights, first and 14th amendments, protected speech. that's hogwash. here is the bott
guaranteed act, on par with the civil-rights of the 1960's. host: john from illinois. caller: the only problem that i have is about the tax issue. the reason why i say that is our taxes in this country have never been set up to be fair. what they were set up for was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes. working-class and the port were supposed to pay the majority of theirs in homeowners' taxes, city and state taxes -- ordering class and the poor. everything is out of sorts. when you are on fixed income and these states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government will have such a lower one. anybody i fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator that costs $400, will have about a $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. the ones it will hurt our people that are retired, people that are on disability, things like that. otherwise, i am completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul in 1988. i voted for paul brown. i think he -- i can remember what year it was that he ran as a libertarian. once.ed for ross p
question front and center unlike in the civil rights and the feminists and many of the important movement of our time where there was fear of going in that direction, it would split people, they weren't ready for it, the police would be angry and all the rest of it. this is a movement that said, no, no, no, we're putting the question of the 1% right front and center. that opens a space that i have since filled, that this book is not doable without the space opened by occupy wall street for the interest. if i'm correct in understanding, this is now in its third printing, and it only appeared in may of this year. that -- the thanks go to the people like the occupy wall street people who are willing to break from the tradition not to be limited by the tweedledum, tweedledee either/or republican and democrat and are willing to now push in another direction. >> well, another question on the occupy movement is, was asked about, well, what's happened to it? it seems to have gone into some kind of reis access or stasis. recess or stasis. >> a great political leader of the left whose name i won't
women are entitled to the same exact rights all the civil rights all the civil liberties and quite frankly i don't see much of a distinction beyond that. >> reporter: it may be just a coincidence, but biden has done no national tv interviews since then but a week from tomorrow there will be plenty of questions for biden on the debate stage against paul ryan who is famous for his command of budget details. biden's best threat is simply to stick to the script. >> hard to stick to the script sometimes. thank you, bill plante. >>> donnie wahlberg toured with the new kids on the block this summer. hi, donnie. his latest stop is our green room. we'll ask him about reviving his boy band days and his new hit show, "bluebloods." you're watching cbs "this morning". did you take my truck out last night? 'tis tasty. >>> cats may have nine lives but we have a story of two dogs who may be the ultimate survivor. >> one of the dogs met up with a car on the east coast the other had trouble with a truck on the west coast. terrell brown reports it's incredible they are both alive. >> reporter: since
that ron paul has history. what of his histories is the civil rights act of 1964. it valued the property rights of businesses. [inaudible] let's get to the issue of mitt romney. i'm not crazy about everything the president has done but being a businessman does not necessarily qualify you to run a country simply because the demands of a corporation are not the same as those of the nation. guest: one of the things that research has shown is that young people don't score differently on political knowledge questions. the people who are older than them, above 30, -- they may lack some experience but a great deal of young people who have other issues, people are concerned about jobs in the economy. when they have doubled the of employment rate, those people have a great deal of patience on issues in their voices should be heard in their communities and nationally because of that experience and because of our democracy. host: we're heading into the final weeks of the campaign. in the postgraduate realm, 57% are supporting barack obama. some colleges are evenly divided. jonesboro, arkansas, good
and having been in charlotte, a great civil-rights city, where the students from the historical black college in 1960 set up a lunch counter in to grant them and yet, what do we see today? state after state, efforts to suppress voting rights instead of expanding them. not enough people vote in this country. in pennsylvania, there is legislation now on the books that could disenfranchise between 750,000-1 million people. president obama won by 600,000 boats in pennsylvania last time. this really does determine the election. i don't care who you are for. this will determine the election. it is a huge problem or the country. we should be celebrating voters going to the polls, not putting impediments in their way. host: the radio program " democracy now" turns 25 this year? guest: we started in 1996. we were just on radio. the week of september 11, 2001, we started on the first television station in new york city on public access. then it just caught on like wildfire. beyond the election and more television stations aired us and radio stations and npr stations and pbs stations all over the countr
it might keep people away from the polls. civil rights groups applauded the judge's decision. >> this is a victory today for the people and a loss for those scheming and lying legislators in harrisburg who thought they could hijack the presidential election. >>> the judge could still decide the law can go forward after the presidential election. >>> in other news this morning, american airlines and its pilots' union back at the bargaining table this week after agreeing to reopen contract talks. the pilots rejected american's last offer in august. but now they say they will seek an industry standard contract. meanwhile, american says improperly installed clamps caused rows of seats to come loose on three flights in the last week. the airline is inspecting its planes for similar problems. >>> two scenes of economic recovery this morning including a streak in new car sales. the car of sales and trucks, it rose 13% in the last month compared to a year ago. the last time sales figures were this good february of 2008. small efficient cars are fueling the sales trend. >>> and home p
's civil rights, workers rights, or women's rights where people remember why unioners created. most of the world has no rex why it happened. you had to work 18 hours and never got overtime. you got paid a number you live in a town which you work. people don't understand where the value base came from. there is going to be an evolution or innovation in the movement. i see union doing all kinds of interesting thing. don't corporate affairs work they follow pension resources and they take their own money and create economic development. that's smart. looking how do i get economic activity get my folks. ensure my rate of return. do something to get the economy to move again. i think there's a lot of compelling unions that are think abouting it circhtly. to underestimate the kind of [inaudible] >> i would say one thing to watch political any in the jersey we come from a unionized state than a lot of states in the south. the union have different power and i think one of the things that is important to watch you saw it in wisconsin and you see in other places it's a growing system between
.s. citizen, i have a long and proud history of peaceful civil disobedience to draw on when facing injustice like racism or any other kind of movements throughout this country's history in which civil disobedience has been used, such as the women's rights movement or in the protest in the war in vietnam. >> this took place when the united nations general assembly was in town. here you are asking police what you're being arrested for. what were you charged with? >> eventually -- i wasn't told on the spot. i was neither read my rights nor was i told what i was being arrested for. but later at one of the precincts where i was held, and before i was taken to central booking, i was told i was charged with criminal mischief, making graffiti and possessing a graffiti instrument. i was after 22 hours arraigned before a judge and i'm supposed to return in november to see whether i will be put on trial on these charges or not. >> do you think that spray painting this particular ad was a form of peaceful disobedience? was that what you were trying to sort of -- the message you were trying to send? >> m
dependency system. that is by no means clear. in europe today people demonstrate and right to protest almost any cutback, and they have an absurd welfare state. why are they so upset? increase government along replace civil servants extra for coming to work on time. using a computer. in italy teachers no longer can retire with a fat pension at age 39. there are other cutbacks, but not many. european welfare states are bigger than ours. now growing faster than theirs. is this what we face? once people are used to getting free stuff they fight to hold onto it. our welfare state money will run out. people can't keep voting themselves free stuff. well, i guess they can, but the money will run out. mitt romney expresses let's hea. believe they are entitled to the health care. john: entitled. people feel entitled to government handouts, they tend to do this. when governments take some handouts away. this hope, maybe we will learn from what is going on in europe. probably not. americans don't pay much attention. the few countries did reform the welfare state without bloodshed. socialist canada cut
, yemen is expressed their will in providing or in niending -- finding a solution or avoiding the civil war, and, therefore, yes, yemen voted yes for a peaceful state. civil state, mod enstate, that is based on rule of law and respect of the rights of which allow us to get into the second phase and to implement what's left of the political solution and get the yemen out of the bottleneck and to make it less safely, and we have law -- draft law of the transition that will assist in solving all the bloodshed and all the conflicts, and we still in need of the political and economic assistance that we'll help -- will help us a lot in implementing all the other segments of the gulf initiative, and this is why the yemen people are looking for. we got tired of conflicts of wars, and now and through the national dialogue that we are preparing for in order to get this dialogue as soon as possible so we will have a blueprint of a prosperous yemeni based on future freedom and equality and through good governess by reforming the administration and combat corruption and focus on development, and we
. i analyzed the situation to determine where it needed to be done and did the right thing. i think that that can happen. i think that by working together, that by being civil, you know, you have not seen any attack ads run by me. there have been attack ads run in this campaign, but not endorsed by me. i think that by partisanship is called for and can be accomplished, and i will work to do that. [applause] >> mr. plummer? >> absolutely. what i said i and my opening statements was true. the voters are hurting. they do not care if they are -- if you are republican or democrat. our farmers are struggling through one of the worst seasons they have ever seen. i announced this week that i would call for a discharge petition against leadership because they need a farm bill. there are some very serious policy issues out there now. is this right for southern illinois? there are a lot of issues that are not. obama care is bad. cap and trade is bad. the dream act is bad. i will not stand up for those issues, pushed by republican or democrat. the fact that the farm bill is not happening right
's he doing? writing notes for the next debate? >> right. >> yeah. the split screens were jarring a little bit. one thing to point out, it may not amount to much, but it's worth mentioning is it was a remarkably not only substantive but civil debate. the way they came out. mitt romney's congratulations about the anniversary felt heartfelt. the way that president obama looked at him and nodded quite often. they went at it. they had a smart intellectual debate, but they did it in a civil way. and the one thing, though, that was not there that we took for granted was the 47% comment. i thought that was going to be the theme of the debate. >> my god, why not hammer that home? >> why not? why not? >> the bain record. there were a lot of things. i think part of the thing that's going on with president obama was, a lot of his debate prep was designed to make sure that he preserved his main asset in this race, which is his likability. that they know how important that is. he doesn't really like mitt romney at all. he has a lot of contempt for romney. and i think a lot of his preparation w
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)